How to Heat Your Livingroom with Computers

It’s time I explained what all this cluster computer stuff is about. It’s kind of an insane project, but bare with me. Some of you may have played the Wikipedia game “Seven Steps to Jesus.” Basically, it’s a special case of the Wikipedia game Wikirace, where you try to get from one article to another as quickly as possible. In Seven Steps to Jesus, you try to get to the Wikipedia article about Jesus in seven clicks or less. Why Jesus? Why seven? Who knows, who cares. But the point is, that it’s fun for about ten minutes.

This ridiculous game wandered into my mind the other day, and I started thinking, “I wonder how you could create a computer program that would play Seven Steps to Jesus…” The answer depends. If you give the program access to the entire Wikipedia database, then the task is trivial. It’s very simple and quite fast to spit out the minimum number of steps from one article to another. But what if you don’t give the program access to the entire Wikipedia database? What if it has to go to an article, and choose which link to click just like humans do: with “intuition?”*

As you might have guessed, the task becomes more complicated. Now we’re talking about machine learning (FUN!) I started to think about how you could train an AI to assign a “relatedness” value to every given article on Wikipedia by giving it access to the Wikipedia database, and having it traverse the links from one article to another. If you’ve taken a class on AI, you know that eventually, this relatedness value will converge to the shortest path. Basically, this program will do nothing useful… except heat my living room.

Except! Except that I’m going to train an RL agent in parallel. That’s the only thing that might be novel about this (other than the fact that I’m introducing the “Seven Steps to Jesus” task to the AI world.) Ordinarily, you would want the agent to learn sequentially, because if the links change, you want the agent to learn with the changes. But in this case, I really don’t give a damn about sequential updates. Also, this task is stationary (the distance between any two articles in my downloaded Wikipedia database will never change,) so updating sequentially doesn’t matter all that much.

So what you should get from this, is that this project is a HUGE waste of time. But it’s fun, and I’m learning about graph databases, and RMI, and I got to build and run a computing cluster. Maybe there’s a real task for which this approach is suited. I’m not sure though. Usually in RL, you have to run a trial many times in order to test an approach, so there’s really no point in distributing the actual processing. In other words, if you’re going to run 100 trials of your schmancy new algorithm, you might as well just run one trial on five different machines until you finish, rather than splitting up the computation (which adds overhead,) into five different parts.

The point is, I’m having fun. Leave me alone.

Discipline Week Update: Today was day four of Discipline Week, and so far so good. I’ve been trying to avoid napping, because I want to really embrace this 7am to 11pm schedule I’ve got going, but today I really needed a nap. I ended up sleeping for maybe an hour and a half, which is really too much, but we’ll see how things go tomorrow. I’ll write a more detailed post tomorrow about how Discipline Week is going, but I thought I’d let you know that it’s still a thing, and it’s going well!

*Yes, there are algorithms that do this quickly, but you’re still missing the point: the point is, this will be fun. Fun, I tell you, FUN!

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