Valentine’s Day: Musical Hearts

Here it is, ladies and gentlemen: this year’s Valentine’s Day computer art project. For the past two years, I’ve done some sort of computer art project for Valentine’s Day. The first was a 3D printed heart with a red LED inside. Last year, I recorded my entire bus trip to school, and wrote a program to select only frames with a certain amount of red in them, and compile them into a video. This year’s project was slightly more ambitious.

My original idea was to take videos of artistically interesting things on my walk to school. A computer program would then find trackable points on the video, and “stick” hearts to those objects. The sizes of the hearts would correspond to the amplitudes of certain frequency ranges in a song that would play in the background… a song which I would compose and create on my computer.

Several factors led to my cutting out the motion tracking entirely (namely that OpenCV is complicated, and Adobe After Effects hates me.) However, the hearts respond to the sound of a song that I composed and performed using ChucK, which is a programming language for creating sound. If you hadn’t already guessed, the red heart is low frequency, pink is midrange, and white/light pink is high. While the result isn’t nearly as cool as my original idea would have been, I think it’s pretty nifty, and it was fun to make. I also learned about some valuable tools in Processing.

To record the videos, I walked from Westmount to McGill at 7:40am, in -15 degree weather, without gloves. When I got to McGill, I could hardly feel my hands. So it’s safe to say that I put a lot of effort into this video.

(There was initially a problem with the upload, which has now been corrected.)

For the sake of comparison, for last year’s video I used two programs, one of which I wrote myself (Cinelerra and a python script for selecting video frames based on color composition.) For this year’s video, I used a grand total of 8. In order of usage (more or less:) ChucK, miniAudicle, Sound Flower, Audacity, Processing, Adobe After Effects, and Adobe Premiere*, and a Java program that I wrote in Processing.

*I am currently upset with Adobe. As a student, I cannot afford a license for the Adobe Creative Suite; a marvelous collection of software. I also have no intention or ability to make a profit from the work I have would do with the Creative Suite. If I spent my free time playing with Photoshop, After Effects, and all the other neat programs on my own computer, however, I might be able to make money from my work some day, at which point I would buy the Creative Suite so I could profit from my art. On the other hand, there isn’t a chance in hell I’m going to spend $899 on the Master Collection just to tinker. Therefore, it’s in Adobe’s best interest to offer a FREE (as in beer) version of the Master Collection to students for strictly non-profit, educational use. So there, Adobe, the ball is in your court now.

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